Archive for January, 2012

25
Jan

Company Fined $2,000 For Worker’s Death In Indiana

January 25, 2012

January 25, 2012

An Evansville, Indiana, manufacturing company has been fined by Indiana’s Department of Labor in connection with the death of a worker in August of 2010. According to reports from Channel 13 News, the company responsible for the death, Bootz Industries, was fined $2,000 by the department for their part in causing the accident.

Records show that the 49-year-old worker was killed when a forklift he was driving hit a sidewalk and flipped over on top of him. It was determined that the worker was not wearing a seat belt and may not have been safe to operate because of leaking fluid lines. These findings prompted the Indiana Department of Labor to investigate, who mandated a $3,500 fine to the company. The fine was later reduced to $2,000 after the company agreed to take the forklift out of service and retrain drivers on forklift safety and use in the next 30 days.

No civil action has been taken against the company in connection with the death of the worker, but the statute of limitations on wrongful death cases is two years.

While the family may still have several months to file a wrongful death case against the company and others responsible for the accident, the Indiana wrongful death lawyers with Stewart and Stewart Injury Lawyers recommend filing a claim as soon as possible after the accident.

18
Jan

Indiana Considers Nursing Home Emergency Policies

January 18, 2012

January 18, 2012

After it was discovered that staff in numerous nursing homes across Indiana were not properly calling for help in emergency situations concerning patients, WTHR 13 News reports that state lawmakers are creating new regulations that will work to ensure patients get the care that they need in a timely manner.

The push was sparked by the death of a woman last March. She was suffering from cardiac arrest when caregivers at Wildwood Healthcare found her. The LPN on-duty called CARE ambulance to take the woman to the hospital, but the company did not have an ambulance available. Instead of passing the call to the Volunteer Fire Department five minutes away, CARE called in an off-duty crew nearly 20 minutes away. The woman died waiting for the ambulance.

In the aftermath of the tragedy, the state health department found that the facility was negligent cited Wildwood healthcare for “failure to ensure appropriate care” to patients for failing to call 911 at two key moments.

In response, lawmakers created State Senate Bill 224, which would require state officials to create a new report on response times and practices for responding to 911 calls. Also, it would create equipment requirements on ambulances, and transportation procedures for nursing home emergency and non-emergency transport.

The Indiana nursing home abuse lawyers with Stewart and Stewart say that it could be considered neglect on the caregiver’s part to not call 911 during an emergency. If you have been hurt or lost a loved one because of a caregiver’s negligence, get in touch with us today to discus your case.

11
Jan

New Guidelines Regulate Children’s Safety Seat Use

January 11, 2012

January 11, 2012

In an effort to educate parents and caregivers on how to select a child safety seat and when the appropriate time is to transition your child to the next type of safety seat, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has issued a press release discussing new guidelines the agency has set for children’s safety seats.

The new guidelines are categorized by age, rather than by type of safety seat. This is in an effort to stay relevant to data showing that this is what new child restraint system development is based on.

Recommendations for children’s car seat positions were:

  • Birth-12 Months– Child should always ride in rear-facing car seat
  • 1-3 Years– Keep your child in rear-facing car seat as long as possible based on height and weight limits set by the seats manufacturer. When your child has outgrown the rear-facing position, then move them to a front facing car seat
  • 4-7 Years– Keep your child in the forward-facing car seat until they have reached height and/or weight limits established by the seat’s manufacturer
  • 8-12 Years– Keep your child in a booster seat until they are big enough to fit into a seat belt properly

Indiana state law says that children under the age of seven are required to be buckled into a child safety restraint system when riding in a car.

The Indiana auto accident attorneys with Stewart and Stewart Injury Lawyers ask that parents check their children’s safety seat limits to ensure they are in compliance with the new regulations.

4
Jan

Are Playgrounds Too Dangerous Or Too Boring?

January 04, 2012

January 4, 2012

While playgrounds for kids today may be designed with a child’s safety as the first priority, new research shows that these “play safe” designs may be leading to a generation of bored, inactive kids. According to an article released today by WTHR 13 News, research from a study done at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center shows there is a desperate need to balance safety concerns with vigorous and stimulating play.

Data was collected from more than 100 childcare providers and focus groups in different areas and income levels surrounding the city over several years. Three main problems were determined to be contributing to blocking children from getting the exercise they need:

  1. State licensing codes and financial constraints that restrict equipment choices
  2. Injury concerns
  3. Pressure to put classroom learning as a priority above playtime

Researchers added that children are proven to concentrate and learn better after brief periods of vigorous activity.

Opponents to the findings say that researchers failed to take into consideration the number and types of injuries that can occur on the playground. Angela Mickalide, director of research and programs for Safe Kids Worldwide, said that nearly 220,000 children visited Emergency Room facilities in 2009 with playground equipment-related injuries. The most dangerous equipment seemed to be older slides with steep grades and climbers between 8 and 10 feet high.

The Indiana personal injury attorneys with Stewart and Stewart Injury Lawyers would like to know what you think about this debate. Do kids need a heightened challenge during playtime or are playgrounds dangerous enough already? Tell us what you think by posting to our Facebook page.