Archive for the ‘ Brain Injury ’ Category

4
Nov

Concussion Goggles Teaching Indiana Teens the Dangers of Brain Injuries

November 04, 2015

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1.7 million Americans sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year. One of the leading age demographics for this particular type of injury are adolescents between ages 15-19. Most of these injuries are sustained while playing sports, considering 5 to 10 percent of athletes suffer a TBI during the playing season.

The Indianapolis brain injury lawyers at Stewart & Stewart Attorneys explain that in order to help reduce the number of Indiana teens who suffer TBIs, one organization is working to raise awareness about how a concussion can affect our ability to perform everyday tasks. This is being achieved through the distribution and use of what is known as concussion goggles.

An article from The Star Press states the goggles work by simulating the effects a TBI can have on our abilities to see and perceive time and space. Officials with the Dave Duerson Athletic Fund—who are providing the 60 pairs of goggles to Indiana Public Schools—hope that seeing the effects a TBI can have will persuade young athletes to work to avoid such injuries, as well as seek medical attention if they suspect they have suffered a TBI.

So far, the program has been deemed a success, with one 16-year-old participant claiming she would “think twice” if she suspected she or a teammate had suffered a TBI.

Recognizing the dangers of a TBI is the first step toward preventing such injuries from occurring, which is why the Indianapolis personal injury attorneys at Stewart & Stewart are hopeful to see these concussion goggles making their ways into the hands of young athletes from all across the state of Indiana.

 

22
Jul

Groundbreaking New Game May Be Treatment Option for Brain Injury Victims

July 22, 2015

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) victims often display changes in mood and/or personality. The Indianapolis brain injury lawyers at Stewart & Stewart Attorneys point out that as many as 60 percent of TBI patients are diagnosed with a condition known as alexithymia, which can be identified by the patient displaying difficulties recognizing his or her own emotional state, as well as that of others.

Researchers have developed new technology that could one day help rehabilitate TBI patients suffering from alexithymia and similar conditions. Furthermore, one company has began testing on a video game that could help treat TBI patients experiencing difficulties expressing their emotions.

An April article from Med City News reports that software creators, EmotEd, are in the beginning stages of launching testing on a scenario-based video game for TBI patients. The game was developed by an associate professor at the University of Indiana School of Medicine in conjunction with the Indiana University School of Informatics and Indiana-based company, DeveloperTown.

The game works by teaching TBI victims how to identify and recognize emotions in themselves and others.

One of the groundbreaking aspects about the game is that it’s an online experience, meaning users can play the game at home. This reinforces what is learned during rehabilitation therapy sessions without many of the costs.

At Stewart & Stewart Attorneys, we are hopeful that technology can be used to help provide faster and more efficient treatment for brain injury victims. Our Indianapolis personal injury lawyers are anxious to see how TBI treatment continues to evolve.

 

8
Jan

Study Shows Rest May Be Vital to Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery

January 08, 2014

Data indicates that an estimated 1.7 million Americans suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) each year. Roughly 800,000 of these injuries require medical treatment, prompting many to work towards finding better ways to treat TBIs. The Indianapolis Brain Injury Lawyers with Stewart & Stewart Attorneys explain a new study shows getting plenty of cognitive rest may be the key to a swift recovery from concussions and other TBIs.

Dr. William P. Meehan III, director of the Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention in Waltham, Massachusetts, was in charge of the research being conducted on a group of 335 children who had suffered a brain injury. Data collected over a period of several weeks determined those who were cognitively engaged in behaviors such as playing video games, doing homework, or sending and receiving text messages, had slower recovery times than those who got more cognitive rest.

According to an article from Reuters, children who engaged in less cognitive activity following their actions recovered from their injuries in roughly 20 days, while those who were highly cognitively engaged required up to 100 days to fully heal.

The research supports typical treatment of complete cognitive rest for a TBI victim for a period of three to five days.

The law firm’s team of Indianapolis Personal Injury Lawyers recognizes how difficult it can be to recover from a TBI, and they are here to help anyone who has suffered such a head injury through no fault of their own.

14
Aug

Indiana Schools Implement Policies to Help Protect Student Athletes

August 14, 2013

August 14, 2013

With the dangers that Traumatic Brain Injuries can pose to young athletes, lawmakers and officials with the State of Indiana’s school system have implemented policies aimed at protecting student athletes from harm.

According to an article published by The Kokomo Tribune, legislators passed the Senate Enrolled Act 93 of 2010 requiring that all coaches, athletes, and players receive information about the symptoms and risk of brain injuries, such as concussions. Parents of athletes also must sign consent forms stating they recognize the risks of concussions.

Furthermore, any player who displays the symptoms of a concussion or brain injury must be pulled from participation until a trained medical specialist clears him or her to return to the field.

The moves come after research linked head injuries to serious adverse health events being experienced by former professional football players. The findings hit closer to home when a standout Marion High School football player was seriously injured in 2008 as a result of a blow to the head.

Experts are also pushing for players to utilize new technologies aimed at preventing head injuries as well.

The Indianapolis Personal Injury Lawyers with Stewart & Stewart Attorneys remind athletes to be extra cautious during the coming fall season and encourage them to speak up and seek assistance if they feel they have suffered a serious head injury.

25
Apr

Wearing A Helmet Important When Riding ATVs

April 25, 2012

April 25, 2012

With the weather beginning to warm up, many Indiana residents are bringing their ATVs out of storage and taking them for a ride. The machines can be dangerous as the rough terrain combined with high power and little protection to the body of the driver can often lead to accidents.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says that in 2009, 649 people died and an estimated 131,900 individuals required visits to the emergency room due to ATV accidents.

Take, for instance, the recent case of a 49-year-old central Indiana man who died Tuesday in an ATV accident. According to reports from WISHTV-8 News, the accident occurred Saturday in Darlington County. The man was riding an ATV for the first time when he lost control of the vehicle. He was thrown from the machine and collided with a nearby tree. The impact caused the man to suffer serious head injuries, as he was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident.

Rescue crews were able to transport the man by helicopter to St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis, but he died three days later from the injuries he sustained.

This is why the Indianapolis Brain Injury Lawyers with Stewart and Stewart Injury Lawyers encourage anyone riding an ATV to always wear a helmet. Following this simple precaution will greatly decrease your chances of serious injury in the event of an accident.

22
Feb

New Blood Tests Ordered In Metro Officer’s Drunk Driving Case

February 22, 2012

February 22, 2012

Prosecutors in the highly publicized vehicular homicide and drunk driving case against an Indianapolis Metro Police officer said Friday that they want a second vial of the officer’s blood tested. According to reports from WTHR 13 News, the testing is being done in hopes of solidifying a case against the officer accused of hitting a group of motorcyclists, killing one and critically injuring two others.

The accident happened on August 6, 2010, when the on-duty officer was driving his squad car with a blood alcohol level of more than double the legal limit. The officer was arrested on drunk driving and vehicular homicide charges. Two weeks later, the drunken driving charges were dropped because an unlicensed lab technician took his blood samples.

In January of last year, a new prosecutor brought the charges against the officer again, only to have them dismissed by a judge a few months later. In October, a judge ruled that the tests could be used as evidence in the vehicular homicide and criminal recklessness cases against the officer.

That same month, the two surviving accident victims filed a personal injury lawsuit against the city, the Indianapolis Metro Police Department, and the officer for permanent injuries they suffered in the accident.

The Indianapolis Motorcycle Accident Attorneys with Stewart and Stewart Injury Lawyers may be able to help you if you’ve been injured in an accident that was caused by another driver’s negligence.

4
Jan

Are Playgrounds Too Dangerous Or Too Boring?

January 04, 2012

January 4, 2012

While playgrounds for kids today may be designed with a child’s safety as the first priority, new research shows that these “play safe” designs may be leading to a generation of bored, inactive kids. According to an article released today by WTHR 13 News, research from a study done at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center shows there is a desperate need to balance safety concerns with vigorous and stimulating play.

Data was collected from more than 100 childcare providers and focus groups in different areas and income levels surrounding the city over several years. Three main problems were determined to be contributing to blocking children from getting the exercise they need:

  1. State licensing codes and financial constraints that restrict equipment choices
  2. Injury concerns
  3. Pressure to put classroom learning as a priority above playtime

Researchers added that children are proven to concentrate and learn better after brief periods of vigorous activity.

Opponents to the findings say that researchers failed to take into consideration the number and types of injuries that can occur on the playground. Angela Mickalide, director of research and programs for Safe Kids Worldwide, said that nearly 220,000 children visited Emergency Room facilities in 2009 with playground equipment-related injuries. The most dangerous equipment seemed to be older slides with steep grades and climbers between 8 and 10 feet high.

The Indiana personal injury attorneys with Stewart and Stewart Injury Lawyers would like to know what you think about this debate. Do kids need a heightened challenge during playtime or are playgrounds dangerous enough already? Tell us what you think by posting to our Facebook page.

20
Mar

Gunshot Wound Leaves Teenager with Indiana Brain Injury

March 20, 2008

March 20, 2008

The South Bend Tribune reported that a seventeen-year-old male teenager suffered an Indiana brain injury during a shooting and has been hospitalized.

Police found the Indiana brain injury victim lying alone in an alley.

Several people had been seen fleeing the crime scene after the shooting occurred in the South Bend area of Indiana and Michigan, and were able to avoid the arrival of police officials.

This shooting incident is still under investigation.

Read More:
http://www.southbendtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080316/News01/803160342&SearchID=73311970157919